#AcWriMo 2017: Slaying my research demons

It’s November 1, which long time readers of this blog know means that it’s time once again for #AcWriMo! Academic Writing Month is the academic’s version of NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month). Academics commit to 30 days of research progress of all types — getting articles/book chapters/book proposals/dissertations completed and/or out for review, starting a new project, completing a literature review, writing simulation code, etc.

I’ve been a long term participant in AcWriMo (2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016). Every year I think “maybe this is the year I skip it”, but every year I come back. There is something about the public accountability, the thrill of keeping research momentum going during a crazy busy time of the academic year, and the community that keeps me coming back. Even this year, when I have a daily writing practice that’s going rather well and projects that I’m making clear progress on.

This year, I’m using AcWriMo to not only make research progress, but also to confront some of my own research demons. You see, there’s this research project that I started on sabbatical — an interview project — that’s stalled. Yeah, part of it is because I’m busy, but a bigger part of it is because I have completely psyched myself out about it. I’m at the stage where I should be interviewing subjects that I’ve recruited, and I’ve stalled out on the recruiting stage. Because recruiting participants is Scary and it means I might have to Talk To People I Don’t Know or, worse, Ask People I Know And Like To Give Up Some Of Their Precious Free Time To Help Me. (And I hate asking people for help.)

But stalling out means that I probably missed out on an opportunity to submit this project to a Late Breaking Work track at CHI. And I am kicking myself because that would have been a primo opportunity to present this work, or at least get some early feedback.

So while I have some other projects I’m working on — a fellowship application due mid-month, a conference paper with a January deadline — I’m only going to specify one goal for this year’s AcWriMo. And that is to get back on track with this interview project. With one goal, I won’t be as tempted to work on my other projects as a means of avoidance, and prioritize them over the interview project. The interview project becomes the priority.

Here is what I plan to do this month:

  • Revamp the project timeline. Given I probably can’t make this late breaking work deadline, where is the next logical place to send this work? Preferably something with an early spring deadline. And then work backwards from there to figure out what to do each week.
  • Rethink my recruiting strategy. The way I’ve positioned this study is not working. I need to rethink how and where I’m recruiting subjects, and redo my “advertising campaign”.
  • Schedule and conduct some damn interviews already! I do have a few people who expressed interest in participating….er, months ago. I plan on following up and hopefully scheduling at least one interview by the end of the month.
  • Complete some of the writing on the eventual conference/workshop paper. There are sections I can draft — the intro, the methods, the lit review — that will save me lots of time later when deadlines loom.

As always, you can follow my progress (and others’ progress too) on Twitter, using #AcWriMo. And as always, I’ll have an update here at the end of the month on how I did.

Good luck to all of those participating! May the writing gods smile upon you.

#AcWriMo, Sabbatical Edition: The Final Reckoning

As I’ve done for the past few years, last month I participated in AcWriMo, the month-long academic writing extravaganza. I started the month with two goals:

  1. Complete an almost-submission-ready draft of a conference paper.
  2. Complete a rough draft of a new research study.

I chose this particular set of goals as a way to address some clogs in my research pipeline. Right now I have a lot of work in preliminary stages and/or various stages of write-up, but nothing out for review. I chose the first goal as a way to move something closer to the out-for-review stage of the pipeline, and the second goal as a way to move a project from the half-baked idea phase to the gee-I-could-start-collecting-data-soon stage.

So, how did I do?

I completely met my first goal. I have a complete draft of a conference paper ready to be tweaked for a particular conference. I did not start the month with a particular conference in mind. Instead, I decided to write a generic draft — more like a tech report — that I could then slightly tweak and reframe for particular venues. So all the source material is there, and all I need to do is edit it. And as luck would have it, a few days ago I found a conference with a mid-December deadline that’s a pretty good fit for it. I’ll need to cut 3 pages and I’ll need to reframe the intro to better fit the conference’s focus, but that should be pretty straightforward. So, bonus, this paper WILL be out for review soon!

I completely met my second goal. My literature search confirmed what I suspected — that this new study area is pretty underexplored. Reviewing the literature, and working through my stash of HCI books, gave me some good ideas for how I might explore this space, and I feel pretty excited about my study plan. Also, terrified, because the new study involves qualitative research methods that I’ve never, ever used before. (I am setting up a lot of meetings with my social scientist friends in the near future!)

I wanted to keep track of how I spent my writing time, so I logged my writing time, number of words, time spent coding, time spent on each project, etc. every day.

research time plot

Time spent over the month on the two projects. “Coding” was code development I did in conjunction with the conference paper.

As expected, I spent more time over the course of the month on the conference paper. This makes sense, because there was a lot more work to do on that particular project and it had a more defined finished product. I also find it interesting that the majority of the work on the new research study was done early in the month. I made a lot of progress early in the month, getting me almost all the way to my goal, which freed up my time to focus on the conference paper. (You can also clearly tell where the weekends are and where the long holiday weekend fell.)

number of words written

Number of words written over the month on the two projects.

It’s a bit demoralizing to see your word count go down over the course of the month, but this reflects the edits on the conference paper. There’s also a faster rate of word production (most of the time) for the new study, because most of that was “new” writing, so it was less edited and vetted. (It also includes the word count for notes I took while reading articles and books for the project.)

I’ve liked the experience of logging my output like this. Sometimes it’s hard to believe that you’re actually making progress when you’re slogging away day after day, but charts like these drive home the point that daily effort does add up over time. I also experimented with journaling about my research every day, and I’ve found that useful as well. I plan on continuing both practices beyond AcWriMo.

As always, I’ve enjoyed the community aspect of AcWriMo, and I will miss that. One of the many things I’ve been thinking about while on sabbatical is how I can recreate some of that supportive community around research and writing at my institution. I hope to come up with some concrete ideas and try them out next year.

I’m so glad I decided to do AcWriMo again this year. I almost didn’t participate because it felt like “cheating” since I am on sabbatical and I’m supposed to be laser-focused on my research. Participating provided me with a chance to reflect on my research practices and experiment with ways of working, as well as set specific and scary goals and make myself publicly accountable. And these are lessons that I’ll take with me beyond AcWriMo and into the new year.

#AcWriMo: Sabbatical Edition

Longtime readers of this blog know that November brings that annual rite of productivity for academics: Academic Writing Month, or AcWriMo for short. The premise of AcWriMo is simple: you set some ambitious research/writing goal(s) for the month and do your darndest to achieve those goals, with the support of a virtual writing community. I’ve participated in 2012, 2013, 2014, and 2015, and have always found it to be a worthwhile experience.

I’m a little late to the party this year — I didn’t finalize my goals until today. And it feels a teeny bit like cheating, since the purpose of being on sabbatical is to have the space to work on your research, so I don’t “need” this challenge to jump-start my research or get back into good research habits, which is my usual motivation for participating. But I really love the community and support around AcWriMo, and I really love the challenge of setting and trying to meet ambitious goals, so that’s reason enough in my book to join in!

I’ve decided on two main goals for AcWriMo this year:

  1. Complete draft of conference paper. I spent a lot of time this summer thinking about restructuring my research. In the process, I identified a line of research that I thought I could complete and submit as a conference paper by the end of this calendar year. I’ve made really good progress so far on this paper. I really really want to end the month with a completed draft that’s pretty close to submission-ready, because if memory serves there’s a submission deadline in early December for a conference that seems like a fairly good fit. To complete this goal, I’ll need to write, debug, and test some simulation code and run some experiments in addition to writing the paper. This is my main goal.
  2. Complete rough draft of new research study. The idea for this study also came out of my Summer of Reflection. I’ve been chipping away at it, but not making as much progress as I’d like. (So much to read! So little time!) With this project, I just need to buckle down, complete a preliminary lit review, and sketch out one or two possible study designs in some detail. The challenging part of this project (and probably what’s been holding me back) is that it’s way more of a “pure” HCI (human computer interaction) project than I’ve ever attempted, and is likely going to involve research methods that I’ve never used before. Exciting! and also terrifying.

As usual, I’ll be updating my progress here and on Twitter (@drcsiz) under the hashtag #AcWriMo. This year, there’s also a fancy schmancy tracking app that I’ll be using. And since I’m planning on writing anyway, I’ll also be participating in a  14 day writing challenge in the middle of the month. If all this doesn’t keep me accountable, nothing will!

Happy November writing, everyone!

#AcWriMo 2015: the final accounting

By all accounts, this was a very successful #AcWriMo for me!

I went into the month of “writing like there’s no December!” with modest plans: just 30 minutes a day, 6 days a week. I just needed to get myself back in the habit of doing research regularly, since research had completely fallen by the wayside this term. My secondary goal: to draft my own private “research proposal” as a way to frame how to spend my sabbatical time.

Because I love me a good chart, here’s a chart that shows the number of minutes and number of words per day I accomplished during the month:

acwrimoChart2015

Figure 1: Time and minutes spent per day on research activities. Note that I did not have a goal for the number of words, but it was interesting to track this anyway.

Note that on some days, I was creating diagrams or sketches, or doing lit searches, so these show up as zero word days. Days that show up as zero minutes and zero words were “rest days”.

I didn’t always hit my 6 days a week goal, but I did end up exceeding my time goal overall. Some days I worked for longer than 30 minutes, and I always worked on research at least 5 days each week. I’m super happy with that. Also, the weeks I decided against the 6th day of research were deliberate decisions, usually because mentally I knew I needed a break.

I spent the time very productively, too:

  • I finished that research proposal, and came up with a reasonable timeline for how to spend my sabbatical (and my non-teaching “scholar in residence” term this spring).
  • I started from scratch and made serious headway on a potential conference paper.
  • The act of working on the conference paper clarified certain aspects of the simulation I’m developing that previously had me (unproductively) stuck and spinning my wheels.
  • I made figures. Lots of figures. Sometimes figure-making can be a procrastination tool, but in this case the process of making figures for this potential conference paper clarified my thinking on the project.

Most importantly, even though I “didn’t have time to do research this term”, I found that the simple act of doing research for 30 minutes a day actually made me more productive overall! Since I had to prioritize my tasks to incorporate research, I spent less time on things I should be spending less time on, and was smarter about allocating the rest of my time.

There was one aspect of this year’s #AcWriMo that I didn’t expect, and that almost derailed me at the start of the month. Longtime readers of this blog may recall that my father passed away somewhat unexpectedly last April. Since that time, I’ve found research to be an epic struggle. During the first week of #AcWriMo, I realized why: going back to my research, in my mind, meant revisiting that time period, which meant starting to deal with my grief. Ignoring my research became a way for me to avoid the grieving process. #AcWriMo forced me to face this head on—and yes, to finally start grieving the loss of my dad. I was able to finally untangle my research from my grieving, and to start to make progress on both fronts.

I plan on continuing this momentum into December, by participating in the new grassroots #AcWriAdv (academic writing advent)—you can follow my progress on Twitter. My goals for #AcWriAdv will focus mainly on consistency (30 minutes a day, 6 days a week), with a plan specifically to continue work on the conference paper-in-progress and the simulation development. By the end of December, I hope to firmly establish research habits that will carry me into and through winter term—which looks to be as crazy, if not crazier, than fall term. (Gulp.)

AcWriMo 2015: Baby steps back to research productivity

I have a confession to make: I seriously, seriously considered skipping AcWriMo this year.

Let me back up for a minute, for those of you new to the rodeo: AcWriMo is a month-long academic writing extravaganza! AcWriMo is the academic’s equivalent of NaNoWriMo, or National Novel Writing Month. Basically, you as an academic pledge to set some writing/research goals for the month (ideally, that stretch you a bit), sign up so that you’re publicly accountable for those goals, track those goals, get encouragement from the community, and celebrate your accomplishments at the end of the month. I’ve participated the past 3 years (2012, 2013, and 2014), and have found it tremendously beneficial each time.

So why, if AcWriMo’s been so good to me, would I consider skipping it?

Well, in a nutshell, I’m exhausted and sooooooo very far behind on absolutely everything in my work life. Teaching an overload is kicking my ass in the most serious of ways. The last time I even thought about research was back in September, when I ambitiously and optimistically set out a research plan for the term, as the picture below shows.

Research plan gone awry.

Notice the lone checkmark, in week 1. That’s pretty much the extent of my research accomplishments this term. We’re now in Week 7.

In short, my time has seriously gotten away from me this term, and this makes me very, very unhappy. It’s been so very easy to justify ignoring the research blocks I also optimistically scheduled on my calendar way back in September—there’s always grading, or class prep, or some “crisis” to consume my time. So, what could it hurt to take a year off from AcWriMo, right?

But honestly, I’m a much better, more focused, happier teacher when I’m regularly working on my research. And honestly, there’s no good reason why I’m not prioritizing research. And I know that it’s so very hard to pick back up with the research after a long layoff—and that’s especially true at this point in my project, where the problems are hard and the path ahead is not clear (and the paper/grant rejections have been coming in fast and furious—seriously, it was a rough end of the summer in that regard).

So I decided to go for it and sign up for AcWriMo again, but with the compromise that the theme this year for my goals is what I stated in the title of this post: “baby steps back to research productivity”. My only goal for AcWriMo is a time goal: 30 minutes a day, 6 days a week. Any research counts, whether that’s reading one of the many papers that’s found its way to my “to read” pile, or working on the Simulation Code That’s Still Not Done, or outlining my potential next conference paper, or writing imagined hate mail to the reviewers that have rejected my work lately. (OK, maybe that last one doesn’t count.) One activity that I will definitely incorporate into my research time is to draft my own, private research “proposal” for my upcoming sabbatical, to help me solidify my thinking about what I want to accomplish next year (when I have the WHOLE YEAR to devote to research!). I’ll be tracking my progress on Twitter (@drcsiz) and occasionally here as well.

If you’d like to participate, this link has all the details. If you’re a fellow academic, I hope you’ll consider joining me! Let’s be productive together!

#AcWriMo final progress report

Yesterday marked the close of #AcWriMo 2014, that month-long festival of academic writing. At my last two check-in points, I was making slow but steady progress towards at least one of my goals. So how’d I end up doing this year?

  1. Revise my failed NSF proposal from 2012: MET (with some caveats). I’m calling this one “met w/ caveats” because I did ultimately move forward on this goal, just not in the way I originally intended. See, I thought I’d spend my time this month on the actual narrative of the grant, rewriting the prose and using that to figure out what experiments and analyses and such to run in December. However, when I started writing, I realized right away not just where the holes were, but exactly how I had to fill them. The act of writing made the experiments and analyses immediately clear, so I decided to switch gears and concentrate on that aspect of the proposal instead. I’m so glad I did—I made such great headway, and honestly this was something that had me stuck for MONTHS. (As a bonus, I did make some headway rewriting the supporting docs.)
  2. Draft my next conference paper: FAILED. Despite my best intentions, I never quite got around to this one. I kind of knew at the outset that this goal would be a stretch, but I thought I’d at least spend a couple of sessions on it. Nope. However, in its place I did spend a lot of time coding up a pretty significant simulation, which is something I did not envision happening at the outset. And I’m thinking about my data in more productive ways. So I failed, but I failed for a damn good reason.

On balance, then, it was an excellent month, and I’m very pleased with my progress, despite the fact that my goals morphed and my month was every bit as crazy as November typically is.

So what lessons did I learn from AcWriMo this year?

  • Slow and steady wins the race. I reminded myself that I don’t need big blocks of time to accomplish things in my research—almost every day, I worked for an hour or less on my research, and I made tremendous progress (I have almost an entire simulation coded up, start to finish, in under a month!).
  • Productivity begets productivity. Working on research one day makes me want to work on it the next day, and the next day, and so on. And making progress one day makes me really want to get back to my work the next day.
  • Stuck? Just write. I am kicking myself that I didn’t try this sooner. I am still amazed by how quickly the pieces fell into place once I started writing.
  • Go with the flow. My goals changed pretty much right off the bat this month, and instead of trying to force myself to stick with the original plan, I recognized the shift as a big opportunity, jumped on it, and never looked back.
  • Rituals are important. I usually don’t need to trick myself into working, but I appreciated some of the little rituals I developed around my writing/research time: brewing a cup of tea, starting up some instrumental music or ambient noise, setting my notebook and favorite pen at the ready nearby. (And of course, afterwards, checking the #AcWriMo tweets!) It was fun to have the physical reminders of “now it’s time to hunker down and work”.

I plan to continue with my own version of AcWriMo in December. Despite not teaching this month, I still have a lot on my plate, and I think the structure of something AcWriMo-like will help me continue to make progress even as I’m pulled in many different directions. My plan is to carve out 1-2 hours per day (depending on the day) just for research, and specifically for the grant proposal, setting daily/weekly goals much like I did in November. By the end of the month, I’d like to have my most of the major analyses done for the grant proposal, and most of the major edits to the narrative and supporting docs done. I think I can make pretty good headway on this.

To all those who participated, and particularly those who shared their ups and downs on Twitter, thank you. (And special thanks to Charlotte Frost for wrangling this together this year and every year!) It was, and always is, much more fun working in (virtual) community than working alone, and the community aspect of AcWriMo is one of the aspects I enjoy most about the experience. I’m already looking forward to participating in AcWriMo 2015!

#AcWriMo progress report, 2/3 of way through

We’re in the homestretch now for #AcWriMo 2014! It’s hard to believe there are less than 10 days left in this madwriting frenzy.

I’ve made some really good progress on my first goal (revising my grant proposal) since I last posted an update on my progress. I’ve spent much of my writing time writing code instead of words, but it’s been time well spent. (And as one of my colleagues in the writing program here likes to point out, coding IS writing!) I’ve been programming a simulation that will hopefully “prove” (for some definition of “prove”) that the ideas that I’m putting forth in my grant proposal do have merit and are feasible.

It was writing words in the first place (“writing when I have no clue”, from my last post) that led to the coding frenzy of the last week and a half. And when I got stuck on the code for my simulation, which is largely what I’ve been writing, I went back to writing about the simulation, and boom, I figured out how to get unstuck. With any luck, I’ll be able to start running some simulations with the code the first week in December, and then integrate the results into my grant proposal.

The awesome progress I’ve made on my first goal makes up for the fact that I haven’t even touched my second goal—drafting a conference paper. Oops. At this point, I’ll be happy if I just have a rough outline of a conference paper by the end of the month, which I think is do-able given the time I have left.

The good news is that fall term classes ended on Wednesday, so aside from grading (projects and final one-page papers), my time is largely my own for the rest of the month. This means I (theoretically) will have more time per day to devote to AcWriMo from here on out, and can be a bit more aggressive in this final push.

So what do I want to accomplish between now and the end of the month?

  • Write for at least 2 hours every weekday (excluding Thanksgiving!), and at least 1 hour on Sundays.
  • Finish coding up the simulation.
  • Start reviewing and revising some of the supporting documents for the grant proposal.
  • Read over the grant narrative and highlight the main areas I need to revise.
  • Figure out the topic for my next conference paper and make a rough outline of the paper.

I’m not sure how far I’ll actually get on these goals, but hey, it can’t hurt to aim high. Regardless, I’m excited for the writing days ahead, and excited about my research in a way that I haven’t been for quite some time. That alone makes this AcWriMo completely worth it and completely successful in my book!

#AcWriMo progress report, one-third of the way through

I’m 1/3 of the way through AcWriMo 2014, and I thought I’d give an update on my progress so far. (I laid out my goals for the month in my last post, but to quickly review, my goals are: (1) revise my failed NSF grant proposal, and (2) draft a conference paper.)

What’s working

  • Setting out specific, measurable goals for each session. Often, when I’m stuck on a hard problem, I tend to procrastinate by laser-focusing on minutiae. This is what derailed me last year in AcWriMo. This time, I’m setting goals for the week (usually on Sunday evenings), as well as for each day. (I keep track of these in Evernote, as part of my weekly to-do list). I set the following day’s goal based on my weekly goals and where I ended up that day. That’s made it easier for me to get the challenging work done, rather than just putzing around on paper for an hour.
  • Being flexible with my schedule. As department chair, I don’t always have complete control over my schedule. Things come up, and I don’t always have the luxury of saying no to meetings (or crises) that happen to fall during the time I’ve blocked out for writing. Rather than despairing, I’ve done a good job finding other pockets of time to write if my original block of time doesn’t work out, and of re-prioritizing things so that the writing gets done.
  • Writing when I have no clue. I’m in a challenging part of my research—the problems are harder and the path forward is not exactly clear. My goal for the first week was just to write as if I already had the answers. The simple act of doing so clarified a lot of the problems that got me stuck and helped me to think about solutions more productively. In one writing session, I was able to develop the framework for an entire simulation, which I am now starting to code and which, if it works, should answer a lot of the outstanding questions in this project. Yay!

Challenges

  • Life events beyond my control. Our daycare was unexpectedly closed for most of last week, we don’t have backup child care, and my spouse had an even crazier week scheduled than I did. Guess who had to scramble to take care of the kiddos? I tried to squeeze writing in when I could, and I did ok except for one especially crazy day where no writing happened.
  • End of the term craziness. My institution is on trimesters, and our fall term ends right before Thanksgiving. Classes end next Wednesday. Everyone is freaking out and everyone wants something from me RIGHT NOW. Prioritizing in this environment is challenging.
  • Damn kiddos sharing their germs. Thank god for cold medicine, which is the only thing that kept me halfway functional yesterday.

What’s keeping me motivated and productive

  • Slow and steady progress. I’ve accomplished something concrete each session, and more importantly, something I can build upon. The next step is always clear, so it’s easy to pick up where I left off the next day.
  • Ambient noise generators. A student in my first-year seminar shared A Soft Murmur as a design example in class one day. After class, another student showed me Noisli, another background noise generating site. I generally listen to music while I work, but I’m really enjoying working with these sites in the background. (My current favorite combo on A Soft Murmur is waves + birds + a very light singing bowl, while on Noisli it’s forest + stream. I also like the coffee shop sounds.)
  • The support of local participating friends. The fabulous @adriana_estill and @mijavdw are participating too, along with another good friend and colleague who’s “stealth-participating” (i.e without the public accountability). It’s hard to slack when you don’t want to let your friends down!
  • Twitter! I love reading the #AcWriMo tweets. Some days I read them after I’ve met my goal, but some days I read them before writing if I find my motivation lagging. It’s awesome to be part of this academic writing community.

So I think I’d give myself a B+/A- so far in AcWriMo. A solid effort, with some room for improvement. Here’s hoping the momentum continues for the rest of the month!

All in for AcWriMo 2014

November is just around the corner, which means once again it’s time for AcWriMo! For those who don’t know, AcWriMo is the academic’s version of NaNoWriMo (in which people pledge to write a novel during the month of November). The academic version is a bit more fluid—participants set their own academic writing goals for the month, declare these publicly, then write write write “like there’s no December!”.

I’ll admit that I waffled a bit on whether to participate or not this year. I’ve participated the past 2 years, with considerably more success in 2012 than in 2013. I already know it’s going to be a busy, busy month. And yet, I sort of need a kick in the pants as far as my research goes—I’ve stalled a bit and have been spinning my wheels, so if properly executed, this challenge might just get me unstuck and moving forward again.

So, I’ve decided I’m in!

I have 2 goals this month:

  1. Revise my failed NSF proposal from 2012. This was the plan for last year, but ultimately I was not able to revise the grant sufficiently enough for resubmission. I need and want to resubmit it this year. My goal here is to get as much of the narrative and supporting documents done as possible, meet with our awesome grants person, figure out where the holes are, and make a concrete, specific plan to fill in those holes before the deadline (and, more realistically, before I have to start reviewing applications for our tenure-track job, in mid-December).
  2. Draft my next conference paper. I have nothing in the publication pipeline right now. There’s some old data that I’ve never written up for publication, and I sense that some of our newer work might be almost ready to send out. The work-in-progress paper that we successfully submitted this summer shows me that there’s definite interest in our new work, so the sooner I can get some of this data out, the better.

Up until last week, I was really good about protecting my research time (although I don’t always spend this time productively—see “spinning my wheels”, above), and I already have time blocked out on my calendar for research 3 days a week. I plan on carving out a bit more time (20-30 minutes) on my busier days (Tuesdays and Thursdays), and carving out some time on Sunday evenings as well (which I’m hoping will set the mood for the week).

To combat some of the problems I had last year making progress, I plan on having specific, measurable goals/tasks for each writing session (word count, sections revised, checklist written, etc), which I’ll try and set out every week in advance. I’m also going to embrace the strategy of writing as a means of figuring out what to do next, i.e. start with drafting a section as a means of figuring out what data I need, how I will present it, etc. I think this will be the key to get me unstuck in my current work. I’ve done this with great success in the past, so I just need to get back into this habit (and then follow through with actually doing the rest of the work!).

You can follow my AcWriMo exploits on Twitter (@drcsiz), or follow AcWriMo more broadly on Twitter using the hashtag #acwrimo.

Here’s hoping for a productive November!

#acwrimo progress report

It’s been just over a week since AcWriMo 2013, the month-long academic writing bonanza super party, started, so I figured it was a good time for a check-in on my progress this month.

In my last post, I outlined three goals for the month:

  1. Spend at least 30 minutes a day (6 days a week) on research or research writing.Since this is a bit longer than a pomodoro, I’m calling each 30 minutes I spend a “research sprint”.
  2. Finish all of the major experiments that I need for my grant resubmission. (And write up the results as I go along.)
  3. Draft an outline/plan for the rest of the grant narrative revisions. I have a tentative outline at this point, but I’d like to flesh it out more fully so that I can just start filling in the blanks in December.

Goal #1 means I should have 10 writing/working sessions under my belt right now, or 300 minutes if we’re counting that way. I’ve done 8 sessions for a total of 280 minutes (thanks to a couple of longer sessions on days I could squeeze that in). So I’m fairly close on that one. Which is great, because honestly, the biggest challenge this time around has been finding that 30 minutes of time to squeeze in some research. (More on that in a bit.)

Goal #2 has been going slowly. Very, very slowly. See, the experiments I need to do are the hard ones. I’m in the part of this project where I’ve grabbed all the low-hanging fruit and finished the initial proof-of-concept, which means I’m now trying to address some of those harder questions. As far as I can tell, I’m in fairly new territory in terms of what I’m trying to accomplish, and the path forward is rarely clear. I try things, they fail, I spin my wheels for a bit trying to figure out what to do next. I know that this is in fact productive, in the sense that I’m ruling out things that aren’t going to work, but with a grant submission deadline looming it’s hard not to panic. I know from experience that I just need to keep plugging away and that the “breakthrough” will occur, but it’s so easy to get demoralized when everything you do seems to fail or lead to a dead end.

Goal #3….well, let’s not even talk about that one, because I haven’t addressed it yet.

So I’m making progress, but it’s hard and it’s slow. This AcWriMo feels much, much harder than last year’s AcWriMo, and I’ve been trying to figure out why that is. A big part of it is the time crunch. With being chair and with my big external service responsibilities (which all seem to be coming to a head in the next 2 weeks, ugh!) and with the new course prep and not having a grader to help out in my classes, I’m completely swamped. 30 minutes of research is indeed a luxury these days, and some days I just can’t make it work without sacrificing (even more) sleep or eating or running (which is really the only thing keeping me sane these days). I also was reminded after re-reading my mid-term AcWriMo evaluation from last year that I was sick and injured, so I wasn’t running or doing much exercise at all….which, magically, freed up my early morning time for writing and research. With that in mind, the fact that I’ve been mostly successful at finding some time to work despite all the other demands on my time is something I should be very proud of.

The other reason this year feels harder than last year has to do with the nature of the work I need to do. Last year I had very concrete tasks to complete: Finish the narrative draft. Finish drafts of the supplementary documents for the grant. Write a conference talk. These are things I can easily check off. This year my main task, finishing my grant experiments, is less well-defined and more fluid, so it’s harder to quantify “progress”. I am not sure when I will be finished, because I’m not sure what I’ll find. So I don’t get the satisfaction of crossing something concrete off the list—rather, each finished experiment leads to 3-4 more things added to the list.

Despite all the challenges, I am finding once again that participating in this process is helpful and beneficial. I look forward to seeing what I can accomplish in the next week, and the remainder of the month.